Toothbrush 101: When to Replace | Hoboken Dentist

We all know the basics of dental hygiene – we need to do it on a daily basis, we need to do brush for at least two minutes, along with flossing and rinsing with a good anti-bacterial mouthwash to rinse away the cavity-causing bacteria. But what we may not always think about is maintaining the tools you need to keep that smile bright and healthy, namely your toothbrush.

How often should you replace your toothbrush? A question that most individuals fail to answer. To be fair, there isn’t a real specific answer, however the American Dental Association recommends getting a new toothbrush about every three months. A strikingly odd fact about your toothbrush is that it probably is covered with 10 million germs and bacteria. Though this sounds awfully unsettling, have no fear! These bacteria aren’t big enough to threaten your teeth.

There is a proper way to clean and handle your toothbrush right after usage to ensure yourself a greater chance of less bacteria. Make sure to run your toothbrush under tap water and then let it air dry in an upright position, and you should allow sufficient time for your toothbrush to dry before you decide to use it again. When you happen to catch a cold, make sure to replace your toothbrush afterwards to prevent your cold from returning. If you are really worried about bacteria and germs, soak your tooth brush in a mouthwash solution, or use some hydrogen peroxide mixed with water to form your own solution.

Everyone wants a smile to be proud of – make sure you have the proper tools to keep it.

To learn more about toothbrush care, call Dr. David Musarra at Dental Associates of Hoboken at 201-795-2111. Also visit the website at www.hobokenpediatricdentistry.com.

Dr. David Musarra proudly accepts patients from Hoboken and all surrounding areas.

There’s Nothing Wrong with Getting a Little Filler | Hoboken Dentist

Did you know that September is National Self Care Awareness Month? It’s true. If there was ever a time you should take a minute to take a personal inventory of what you need to live your healthiest life, now is it. This includes your dental health. After all, the mouth is the first line of defense against most of our overall health issues, so taking care of it is important.

Unfortunately, there are plenty of instances that happen, and regardless of your dental hygiene routines, you’ve ended up developing a cavity. There is no need to panic – you can have it fixed, but it is going to entail a trip to the dentist. You will be presented with dental filling options, but your options are going to vary. Here is a quick rundown of the types of fillings available:

Amalgam. Amalgam fillings are very durable, easy to use, and inexpensive when compared to other materials. They can sustain very heavy chewing loads, so they are usually used to restore molars.

Composite. Composite fillings are made out of a mixture of glass or quartz and resin, producing a tooth-colored filling. They are durable and provide good resistance against fracture where there is moderate chewing pressure. Composite fillings take a bit longer to complete and tend to discolor over time.

Ionomers. Ionomers, on the other hand, are made out of a mixture of acrylic acids and fine glass powders and used in areas that do not require any chewing resistance since they have low protection against fractures.

To learn more about dental fillings, call Dr. David Musarra at Dental Associates of Hoboken at 201-795-2111. Also visit the website at www.hobokenpediatricdentistry.com.

Dr. David Musarra proudly accepts patients from Hoboken and all surrounding areas.

I Need a Filling. Which Is Best? | Hoboken Dentist

When it’s time to visit the dentist and you find out that you need a filling, it’s never a good feeling to have. Not only have you not taken care of your teeth well, but now you need to have another dental procedure. Many patients are confused by what kinds of dental filling options are available but are dependent on many factors – the patient’s health, where and how the filling is placed and chewing pressure the tooth will have to bear.

Amalgam. Amalgam fillings are very durable, easy to use, and inexpensive when compared to other materials, so they are usually used to restore molars. Unfortunately, amalgam fillings are silver, so they aren’t as natural looking, possible short-term sensitivity, and more tooth structure is removed to conform the filling.

Composite. Composite fillings are natural-looking, durable and provide good resistance against fracture in small to medium restorations where there is moderate chewing pressure. Because less tooth structure is removed when using a composite, a smaller filling can be used than one using amalgam. They are moderately more expensive than amalgam depending on the size of the filling and procedure time is generally longer, and they tend to stain and discolor over time.

Ionomers. Ionomers, on the other hand, are made out of a mixture of acrylic acids and fine glass powders. Ionomers are usually utilized to fill cavities on the root surfaces of teeth or in small fillings that do not require any chewing resistance since they have low protection against fractures.

To learn more about fillings, call Dr. David Musarra at Dental Associates of Hoboken at 201-795-2111. Also visit the website at www.hobokenpediatricdentistry.com.

Dr. David Musarra proudly accepts patients from Hoboken and all surrounding areas.

How To Prevent Cavities in Children

475936549Tooth decay and cavities are a common problem, not just in adults but also in children. Both are a concern for parents all over the world, a problem that may affect as many as half of all children from ages 2 to 11.

For parents out there, the first step in preventing cavities in your children is to understand what causes it and how to treat it.

Possible Causes 

Cavities and tooth decay occur in children when the bacteria in their mouth start eating away at their primary teeth. Also known as dental caries, the main reason why cavities occur in children is inadequate dental care, such as not brushing and flossing your child’s teeth enough.

One of the more common causes, however, is putting children to bed with a bottle of milk or juice. Done regularly, doing so can put children at risk for what’s known as baby bottle tooth decay. This happens because the milk or juice from the bottle can sit in your child’s mouth as they sleep, which creates a place where bacteria can breed and grow.

Letting children eat what they want and when they want it, such as regularly letting your child eat or suck on candies, can also contribute to their risk for cavities.

Prevention

The first thing that you’d want to do is to stop letting your child go to bed with a bottle of milk or juice. If you do give your child something to help him or her sleep, let your child drink water. Also, when you do let your children drink milk or sugary drinks, encourage him or her to drink from a bottle or a sippy cup, as well as to drink them quickly so that the teeth aren’t exposed as much to decay-causing sugars.

Encourage children to brush and floss their teeth every day as well, and be sure to keep their intake of sugary foods and drink at a minimum. Also, try your best to have your child checked by the dentist as soon as his or her first birthday.

For children below two years of age, use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a non-fluoride toothpaste. The latter is because children below two years of age won’t likely know how to spit the fluoride toothpaste out of their mouth, and may end up swallowing it.

Flossing is also recommended and it’s best to that you brush, as well as floss, with your children so as to set an example for them.

Treatment

Treatment for cavities in children will require dental work. For smaller cavities, dentists may use fillings. However, if the cavities are too big, the dentist may have to restore to using dental restorations such as a full crown to prevent the spreading of bacteria.

Dentists may have to remove severely decayed teeth as letting them stay can cause problems for the adult teeth in the future.

For parents, the best way to protect your child’s teeth from cavities and other dental problems is by setting an example. Also, if you teach your children healthy oral hygiene habits early on, such as brushing and flossing every day, as well as visiting the dentist regularly, they’re more likely to enjoy a healthy set of teeth once they grow old. More importantly, however, teaching your children good oral health habits will make sure that they’ll to stick to them throughout their life.

Be sure that your child practices proper oral hygiene and is taken for regular checkups to ensure good oral health. To schedule a routine checkup or professional cleaning for your child, contact Dental Associates of Hoboken at 201-795-2111 or visit www.dentalassociatesofhoboken.com.

Halloween & Your Childs Oral Health | Hoboken Pediatric Dentist

57224815Most dentists agree: Halloween can be scary for parents, but it’s OK to let kids enjoy some treats. While tooth decay is a serious concern, parents can enforce a few simple rules to make Halloween candy safe and fun for their children.

First, understand the risk. The problem of Halloween candy is simple: eating candy day after day allows bacteria-fueling sugars and enamel-weakening acid to sit on teeth, breaking down the protective layers and encouraging decay. Once bacterial colonies begin to set in, the tooth material will be damaged, leading to cavities, fillings, and in some (hopefully rare) cases, full extraction.

Knowing that the risk is related to allowing sugar and acid to sit on the teeth, parents should realize that it’s not the amount of sugar consumed, but the amount of time children are allowed to keep the sugar on their teeth. Where teeth are concerned, it’s less damaging to teeth for a child to eat five chocolate bars in 5 minutes than one bar every hour for five hours – if they’re eaten quickly, the child should brush his or her teeth immediately after finishing, which then cleans the sugar and acid from the teeth.

It’s important to note that not all candy is created equally. While chocolate is often considered bad by many parents, it’s fairly easy to brush off of teeth. Sticky, gummy candies are likely to get stuck to teeth and survive the brushing process. Sour candies tend to be more acidic, which weakens enamel. Chips and pretzels tend to soften and stick to teeth.

Finally, remember that just because Halloween candy is OK from a dental perspective, childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes are a growing problem, and parents should encourage moderation in their treat-seeking children. Set and enforce limits – while kids should be encouraged to enjoy Halloween, they shouldn’t be allowed to eat all of the candy they can gather, and diabetic (or pre-diabetic) children should be especially limited in their treat consumption.

If you have questions about Halloween candy and your children’s dental health, ask your dentist. They’ll be more than happy to help explain the pros, cons, dos, and don’ts of enjoying treat filled holidays.

For more information about oral health by Dental Associated of Hoboken in Hoboken, NJ call 201-795-2111 or visit www.dentalassociatesofhoboken.com.

Dental Associates of Hoboken also proudly accept patients from Hoboken, Weehawken, Jersey City, Union City, North Bergen, Newark, and surrounding areas.